Omaha Professional Dog Photographer Blog | Tips + Sessions
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Dog Photography News, Tips, and Images

Scuba!  Like the tank. This cute dude was full speed at one MPH and thought this was a way to convey his personality...

Meet Jack!  Jack is a rescue Louisiana Catahoula Leopard Dog with that very striking fur pattern and eyes.  I recently did a shoot with...

If you are doing your job as the photographer you are focused on the subject - not what is happening outside of your field of vision. I've seen some funny things appear in my camera over the years that I've missed while shooting or just didn't know it was happening as I was focusing my attention elsewhere. Or you see really unexpected things unfold while you are trying to shoot as fast as possible. From spazzy uncontrollable fun to photobombs, here are a few of my favorites.
Black and white dog photography is about color, contrast, and lighting. I am not always sure how my dog photography processing will turn out until I can see the photo enlarged on my computer. Sometimes I prefer a blue tint, maybe a mocha tint, other times it's about full color with nothing retouched. It's all up to you on how you process dog photography images - experiment and see what result you like.
To get it right the first time, I might take 300 shots. Yes 300. Here is why: Good photography is about getting it as right in the camera as possible.  Every photographer edits photos, but I am talking about learning to see what you need to do, how to set up the shot, taking the photo, and not going back into photoshop to fix mistakes.  You "fix the mistakes" by looking at what you've shot, making adjustments in your camera and behind the lens, then getting it as right as possible. Here are a few things I look for when choosing to shoot or when it is done:

Don't you just love the head turn? At last count, Scooby Doo knew 50+ words. I use to be able to name people...

Another shot that I particularly like from recent commercial work in the dog photography world.  I absolutely adore the pink background coupled with...

There aren't a lot of words to describe this that are better than "aawwww!"  Just a sweet dog and his favorite person -...

Loving the bow tie on a dog's collar. It reminds me of Talledaga Nights when the family is at the table debating baby...

This topic is often referred to as magic light in photography. And getting it is what makes a photo super special. Here are a few tips to help you achieve that and make your people say wow, how'd you do that?!
I've been shooting dogs for years and have learned a thing or two that I thought would be helpful to share with others who want to take snazzy photographs of their pets.  Separating the snapshot from the artwork is obvious to most but we often do not know why we like certain images over others. If you look at images from a technical standpoint as discussed in a future blog, you can see it plain as day. And lens selection is one of the key elements that shapes a concept into art. Here are a few general tips to check out and see if they are right for you: