Dog Photography Props | Tips from Professional Photographer
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Dog Photography Props

Black and White Pet Photography | Professional Pet Photographer Angela Jacquin Omaha, NE

Dog Photography Props

Okay check this out. Dogs are trainable, but they get easily excited. They behave in weird ways, they don’t listen all the time, they are easily manipulated with food. It is what it is.  I go into a shoot expecting this top happen and it’s not a big deal.

I love my clients, but I slightly laugh when parents are apologizing for their dogs predictable behavior in a new situation. I have a camera in their face, there are new sounds, there are other animals watching the shoot, kids are running around us, and so many other shiny objects are distracting your dog’s attention.

Calming the Pooch Down a Knotch

To get your down to go from all jacked up on Mountain Dew to paying attention, sort of, good photographers will use props. They distract, entertain, and allow the dog to focus on what is important – you and the dog creating a moment for the parents.

Try these props during your next shoot

  • Tell the parents to sit further away so the dog doesn’t see them.
  • Squeeky ball behind your back – you’ll get a “omg, did you hear that?!” look – which is super cute to photograph
  • Food! Treats. Good treats beyond the normal dog food kibble. High value treats adds extra focus on you to get a few closed mouth moments
  • Stuffed animal wrapped around your camera lens – seriously this works!
  • An assistant whistling behind you when eyes start to wander
  • Your phone – yes there’s an app for that! Dog whistling app has shakey toys sounds, techno music, and my fav – electronic noises.

Let me know what props you use but definitely come packing to your next shoot!

 

 

Angela Jacquin is an award winning dog photographer based in Omaha, Nebraska. Contact her for a consultation or call 415-697-8310.